Sigma Research
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Sigma Research is a research group specialising in the social, behavioural and policy aspects of HIV and sexual health. It is part of the Faculty of Public Health and Policy at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

ASK program evaluation

ASK program evaluation

We supported GNP+ and STOP AIDS NOW! to evaluate their work in Uganda and Kenya to improve youth-led advocacy for the sexual and reproductive health rights of young people with HIV (photo by STOP AIDS NOW!).


Human Rights Count!

Human Rights Count!

We supported GNP+ in developing an evidence-gathering tool to enable key populations with HIV to document rights violations.The outcome is better informed advocacy for people with HIV.

Chemsex among gay men

Chemsex among gay men

Click here for all outputs from our qualitative study on chemsex in South London, including two podcasts.

HPE monitoring of Local Delivery

HPE monitoring of Local Delivery

Summary of monitoring data from Local Delivery Partners working as part of HIV Prevention England during 2015-16.

African Health & Sex Survey

African Health & Sex Survey

Available now in print or PDF, our final report from the African Health & Sex Survey of 1,000 African people in England.


Comparing estimates from probability and convenience samples of MSM in UK

A new open access paper examining sociodemographic and behavioural differences between men who have sex with men (MSM) participating in recent UK convenience surveys (EMIS; London Gay Men's Sexual Health Survey; Scotland's Gay Men's Sexual Health Survey) and a national probability sample survey (Natsal-3). Analyses compared men reporting at least one male sexual partner (past year) on similarly worded questions and multivariable analyses accounted for sociodemographic differences between the surveys. The paper shows that MSM in convenience surveys were younger and better educated than MSM in Natsal-3, and a larger proportion identified as gay. Partner numbers were higher and same-sex anal sex more common in convenience surveys. National probability surveys better reflect the population of MSM but are limited by their smaller samples of MSM. Convenience surveys recruit larger samples of MSM but tend to over-represent MSM identifying as gay and reporting more sexual risk behaviours. Because both sampling strategies have strengths and weaknesses, we need to triangulate data from probability and convenience surveys.


Partner projects

Making it Count
KWP in practice
HAUS Study of HIV self-sampling